Computing Memo

MEMO – Final

To: Professor Steven Schneider and Ryan Lizardi
From: Azra Kadic
Date: April 2, 2017
Re: Module 4 Computing Memo

Audience

The intended audience for this project are students in the Communications, Design or Technology majors. This design project comes from a course that is specifically outlined to teach them about the evolution of technology while evaluating the different theories used in the field, at the same time.

Platform

For the Computing era, I created an infographic using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign. Both of these are editing programs that allow the user to edit and publish digital and print materials. I am using this software in hopes to increase my design skills with designing print materials such as infographics and marketing material. With this design project, I included the overall idea of the Information Age along with the differences between Web 1.0 and the Web 2.0.

Message

When scientists and engineers first began developing and sharing ideas about the chip and the transistor, they had no idea that the start of the “Information Age” was well under way. (Cortada, p. 208) Even though the computer was initially used by the military, individuals outside of the military began to welcome and crave the new technology when they saw that it was cost-effective and performed new tasks that could not be accomplished with existing technologies.

The invention of the computer, which was a holding cell for the transistor and the chip, introduced a new cost-effective way for companies to share and store data and information, while giving employees a new and improved way to work. The computer was initially only available to companies and businesses to use for processing, accounting, spreadsheets, graphics and communication. Web 1.0 was soon developed and by the late 1990’s, it advanced into Web 2.0. The American public used each computing system to satisfy different needs and achieve desired goals.

Uses and Gratifications Theory

Web 1.0 consisted of read-only, searchable web pages that were owned, edited and controlled mostly by companies. There was no personal connection to the web and no user-interaction was available to the audience. Because of this, companies used the computing system and the Web 1.0 as a tool to attract customers with published content, suppress competitors and increase business revenue. Companies relied on these cost-effective machines to do most of the work for them because of their careful record keeping, tracking data and security, and simple information sharing. In return, Web 1.0 gave companies a secure, profitable and worry-free work environment. 

By now, many computers have been used at work, which created an experienced audience for the Web 2.0. Unlike Web 1.0, Web 2.0 relied on users to control how the system is designed and what content is displayed instead of being restricted to a design platform that only displays information created by the publisher. With the new platform, individuals are able to utilize the Web to create and express their own identity by personalizing and creating their own content, increasing knowledge and problem-solving skills by sharing information, and gaining insight about different cultures by interacting with others. With all of this combined, individuals were attracted to the new Web as it became a space for them to fulfill needs such as social interaction, self-expression and escape.

Infographic can be found here.

Design Considerations:

At the beginning of the module, I was working on an infographic for another professor and realized that I could use some more experience in that area. That is when I decided to do an infographic. I considered making just a comparison infographic between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0  at first but then figured that the background information could be more useful to the audience who would be learning about this topic. A comparison of the two systems wouldn’t give them enough information about this era and just how much the invention of the computer impacted the world.

Design Challenges:

The biggest challenge that I had with this design was picking and choosing valuable information for the infographic that the students would benefit from. I usually have a tendency to provide to much unnecessary information in my designs. To make it easier to understand, I decided to break it up into sections such as the computer, how important it was in America and the differences between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0. I made the infographic vertical so that users would view it from top to bottom — having the focal point at the top of the design lead the viewers eye through each section until they reach the bottom. In hopes of not overwhelming the audience, I decided to pick only what I thought were important details of the computing era.

Sources:

  • Cordata, J. “Progenitors of the Information Age,” Chapter 6 in Chandler, A Nation Transformed
  • Jenkins, 2006, “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture” [http://henryjenkins.org/2006/10/confronting_the_challenges_of.html]
  • O’Reilly, 2005, “What Is Web 2.0” [http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html]

MEMO – Proposal

To: Professor Steven Schneider and Ryan Lizardi
From: Azra Kadic
Date: March 20, 2017
Re: Module 4 Computing Proposal Memo

Audience

The intended audience for this project are students in the Communications, Design or Technology majors. This design project comes from a course that is specifically outlined to teach them about the evolution of technology while evaluating the different theories used in the field, at the same time.

Platform

For the Computing era, I was thinking about creating a static infographic and a user interactive infographic using Adobe Muse. I am still deciding on the initial design platform I want to use to execute this project on but as of right now, my plan is to create an infographic using Adobe InDesign in conjunction with Adobe Muse, which is a layout software that does not require coding skills for designing. I am using this software in hopes to increase my design skills and to learn more about the software as it would be my second time using it. With this design project, I plan to show the differences between Web 1.0 and the Web 2.0 while also relating it back to the uses and gratifications theory.

Message

When scientists and engineers first began developing and sharing ideas about the chip and the transistor, they had no idea that the start of the “Information Age” was well under way. (Cortada, p. 208) Even though the computer was initially used by the military, individuals outside of the military began to welcome and crave the new technology when they saw that it was cost-effective and performed new tasks that could not be accomplished with existing technologies.

The invention of the computer, which was a holding cell for the transistor and the chip, introduced a new cost-effective way for companies to share and store data and information, while giving employees a new and improved way to work. The computer was initially only available to companies and businesses to use for processing, accounting, spreadsheets, graphics and communication. Web 1.0 was soon developed and by the late 1990’s, it advanced into Web 2.0. The American public used each computing system to satisfy different needs and achieve desired goals.

Uses and Gratifications Theory

Web 1.0 consisted of read-only, searchable web pages that were owned, edited and controlled mostly by companies. There was no personal connection to the web and no user-interaction was available to the audience. Because of this, companies used the computing system and the Web 1.0 as a tool to attract customers with published content, suppress competitors and increase business revenue. Companies relied on these cost-effective machines to do most of the work for them because of their careful record keeping, tracking data and security, and simple information sharing. In return, Web 1.0 gave companies a secure, profitable and worry-free work environment. 

By now, many computers have been used at work, which created an experienced audience for the Web 2.0. Unlike Web 1.0, Web 2.0 relied on users to control how the system is designed and what content is displayed instead of being restricted to a design platform that only displays information created by the publisher. With the new platform, individuals are able to utilize the Web to create and express their own identity by personalizing and creating their own content, increasing knowledge and problem-solving skills by sharing information, and gaining insight about different cultures by interacting with others. With all of this combined, individuals were attracted to the new Web as it became a space for them to fulfill needs such as social interaction, self-expression and escape.

Sources:

  • Cordata, J. “Progenitors of the Information Age,” Chapter 6 in Chandler, A Nation Transformed
  • Jenkins, 2006, “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture” [http://henryjenkins.org/2006/10/confronting_the_challenges_of.html]
  • O’Reilly, 2005, “What Is Web 2.0” [http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html]
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